Light Into Light old

A poet, a visual artist, a pianist, a minister — bringing their visions of the Easter Road to Pentecost to life and light. Discover their creative collaboration, see the works of art and poetry here and in the sanctuary, listen to the accompanying music. Their inspiring project remains with us, the artwork and poetry gracing the walls of the sanctuary.

Read their personal reflections about this inspiring project here.  

The Easter Road to Pentecost

The Light into Light series has won one of four Bene awards presented each year by Ministry and Liturgy Magazine in California. The jury was made up of multidisciplinary professionals in sacred art and architecture. Entries were judged on their liturgical relevance, originality, overall concept, aesthetic appeal, and craftman ship & use of materials. Their inspiring project remains with us, the artwork and poetry gracing the walls of the sanctuary. Read their personal reflections about this inspiring project here.  

It was also featured in the United Church Publication, “mandate”. Congratulations to Barb Carr, Norm Esdon, and Ashley Vanstone.

Barb and Norm

The Easter Road consists of a series of eight images designed in 2008 by Barbara Carr. The images are of mixed media, created with many layers of tissue and other papers overlaid on a background colour wash of acrylic paint. Each image includes the circle (a symbol of unity, eternity, completeness), one of eight colours (the three primaries, the three secondaries, plus black and white), a natural form of light (e.g., sun, moon, etc.), and often a reference to the Ontario landscape.

Each image is accompanied by a poem written by Norm Esdon and music by Ashley Vanstone.

Read Norm’s poems that were written to accompany each of Barb’s paintings.

The Angel

Scriptural Inspiration: John 21:15-19

Artwork: Barb Carr

Stones Rolled Back: Norm Esdon, poet

Image Description: “The Angel” shows circles of energy/power radiating from the Angel’s face, in subtle rainbow colours, from white to yellow to orange, etc. The overall colour theme is white. The natural light source represented is the lightening flashing around the Angel’s head. Other details include triangular pupils in the eyes (representing the Trinity, and also conveying an other-worldly appearance); the colours of dawn in the Angel’s skin tone; and the hand gestures, one down to indicate the empty tomb; the other up to indicate “Christ is risen.”

The Garden

The Garden
The Garden

Art and Psalm inspired by John 20:1-18

“The Garden” incorporates the circle theme in the round stone, the curved stairway, the curving trees, and the energy radiating from the Risen One. The overall colour theme is green, and the natural light source represented is sunrise.

Mary is in the act of turning, with one hand indicating the empty tomb and the steps she has climbed, and the other hand reaching out to the Risen One, who extends a hand towards her. There is light in the empty tomb, since Mary has just seen angels there. The steps represent spiritual progress, while the trilliums represent the Trinity, and of course are an Ontario reference.

— Artwork by Barb Carr

The Road to Emmaus

The Road to Emmaus
The Road to Emmaus


Art & Psalm inspired by Luke 24:13-32

“The Road to Emmaus” shows the Risen One talking to two followers as they approach Emmaus. The circle theme is evident in the setting sun, and the curving buildings and trees.

The colour theme is orange, and the natural light source represented is sunset. On the right is a vineyard and on the left is a green wheat field, referring back to the wine and bread of the Last Supper and forward to the meal that will be shared in Emmaus. The buildings and pine trees imply an Ontario setting.

— Artwork by Barb Carr

— Music by Ashley Vanstone

Thomas

Thomas
Thomas


Art & Psalm inspired by: John 20:19-29

“Thomas” presents the Northern Lights as the natural light source, and black as the colour theme. The circle theme appears in the curve of the landscape (giving a slightly off-balance feel), in the figure’s outstretched arms, and in the rounded rocks. The figure’s position expresses openness, acceptance, praise, awe.

— Artwork by Barb Carr

The Fish

The Fish
The Fish


Art & Psalm inspired by John 21:1-14

“The Fish” incorporates the circle theme in the rings of light around the central figure, and in the curving landscape, water and clouds.

— Artwork by Barb Carr

The Lamb

The Lamb
The Lamb


Art & Psalm inspired by: John 21:15-19

“The Lamb” shows a lamb held in Peter’s arm. In his other hand, he holds the shepherd’s crook, a symbol of pastoral care, while around his neck is the key to the Kingdom of Heaven.

The key features three interlocking gold circles, representing the Trinity, and two crosses, one for Jesus and one for Peter. The border of his robe is a stylized fish pattern, a reference to “fishers of men.” The colour theme is yellow, the colour traditionally associated with Peter, while the circle theme is evident in the curving stripes in his robe. The natural light source is the light within all living beings, seen in the lamb’s eye.

— Artwork by Barb Carr

— Music by Ashley Vanstone

Ascension

The Ascension
The Ascension

“Ascension” shows the two figures in white referred to in the scripture passage, while the circular cloud is a swirling energetic spiral around the natural light source — a “sun dog”, i.e., a piece of a rainbow.

Art & Psalm inspired by Acts 1:1-11

This is a reference back to the rainbow in Noah’s story, which represented a promise from God, and also refers to the Risen One’s promise of the Holy Spirit. The colour theme is violet, while the curving rocks of the mountaintop echo the circular theme.

— Artwork by Barb Carr

Pentecost

Pentecost
Pentecost

Art & Psalm inspired by Acts 2:1-13

The dove is a well-known symbol for the Holy Spirit, while the flames are the “tongues of fire” mentioned in the scripture passage. In the flames are pieces of text from Acts 2:1-10 in many different languages — representing the disciples’ words being understood by speakers of many different languages. White flames/feathers bridge the space between the dove and the flames, and echo the shape of the feathers in the Angel’s wings in the first image.

“Pentecost” uses red as the colour theme, while the circle is evident in the rings around the dove and in the partial ring of flames

— Artwork by Barb Carr








Updated 2021 03 31